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Woodward Knows How To Get Tough
When Duty Calls for It in The Equalizer

by Mark Gross (Scripps Howard)

Daily Intelligencer, February 19, 1966

British Actor Edward Woodward laughs easily when people compare his CBS television character in "The Equalizer" (Wednesdays at 10 p.m.) to Clint Eastwood's "Dirty Harry".

Does it make his day to hear such comparisons?

"Actually it is a little flattering," said the actor who plays the enigmable Robert McCall, retired secret agent who is dedicated to helping people in trouble.  "I've been compared with every tough guy ever seen on television.  I wouldn't pretend to agree or disagree with those comparisons.

"There are similarities.  I think I bring my own unique touches to the character".

Indeed, Woodward brings more than 30 years of international stage and screen success to a television role which could easily have been brutalized by any number of tough-guy American actors.  Woodward's McCall is a quiet, menacing presence to the various thugs and slimeballs with whom he must deal.

His clients find him through a classified advertisement in New York, where the show is shot on location.  The clients, mostly women are usually quite ordinary people who somehow stumble into very bad situations.  For example, one was being threatened by a youth gang, another was being stalked by a psycho hitman.

To extricate these underdogs, McCall isn't afraid to use his gun, expertly and repeatedly.  Critics originally harped on McCall's tendency to pull his gun first and ask questions later.

Once described by Laurence Olivier as "the best actor in England", his career has taken him from Shakespearean tours of India, Sri Lanka and Australia to such Broadway successes as "Rattle of a Simple Man".  His theatrical films include "Breaker Morant", "Becket" and "Young Winston".  His television roles and appearances number in the thousands in England, including his own music variety specials such as "The Edward Woodward Hour".

Woodward even had a recording career in England.  He had 12 records, two of which had gone gold in Australia.

Why would he come to New York and work 17 and 18 hours a day,  6 days a week on an American television series?  Woodward laughs easily, again, "Well, I guess I could say that if I had known it would be like this," he said, "I might have thought twice.  Seriously, I still would have done it even if I had known how grueling it was, because I haven't done it before."

"I'm enjoying it immensely because of all the talented actors I work around week after week.  It's super."

 

 

 

 

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This site was last updated

Home
4 New Shows
Equalizer Movie
Duo To Script
Mad Magazine
Get Tough
Welfare Hotel
All New York
New TV Hero
Squeeze
Jolly Good Shows
Child Death
Gray Panther
Creative Side--1
Creative Side--2
Creative Side--3

 

  

Woodward Knows How To Get Tough
When Duty Calls for It in The Equalizer

by Mark Gross (Scripps Howard)

Daily Intelligencer, February 19, 1966

British Actor Edward Woodward laughs easily when people compare his CBS television character in "The Equalizer" (Wednesdays at 10 p.m.) to Clint Eastwood's "Dirty Harry".

Does it make his day to hear such comparisons?

"Actually it is a little flattering," said the actor who plays the enigmable Robert McCall, retired secret agent who is dedicated to helping people in trouble.  "I've been compared with every tough guy ever seen on television.  I wouldn't pretend to agree or disagree with those comparisons.

"There are similarities.  I think I bring my own unique touches to the character".

Indeed, Woodward brings more than 30 years of international stage and screen success to a television role which could easily have been brutalized by any number of tough-guy American actors.  Woodward's McCall is a quiet, menacing presence to the various thugs and slimeballs with whom he must deal.

His clients find him through a classified advertisement in New York, where the show is shot on location.  The clients, mostly women are usually quite ordinary people who somehow stumble into very bad situations.  For example, one was being threatened by a youth gang, another was being stalked by a psycho hitman.

To extricate these underdogs, McCall isn't afraid to use his gun, expertly and repeatedly.  Critics originally harped on McCall's tendency to pull his gun first and ask questions later.

Once described by Laurence Olivier as "the best actor in England", his career has taken him from Shakespearean tours of India, Sri Lanka and Australia to such Broadway successes as "Rattle of a Simple Man".  His theatrical films include "Breaker Morant", "Becket" and "Young Winston".  His television roles and appearances number in the thousands in England, including his own music variety specials such as "The Edward Woodward Hour".

Woodward even had a recording career in England.  He had 12 records, two of which had gone gold in Australia.

Why would he come to New York and work 17 and 18 hours a day,  6 days a week on an American television series?  Woodward laughs easily, again, "Well, I guess I could say that if I had known it would be like this," he said, "I might have thought twice.  Seriously, I still would have done it even if I had known how grueling it was, because I haven't done it before."

"I'm enjoying it immensely because of all the talented actors I work around week after week.  It's super."

 

 

 

 

Home | 4 New Shows | Equalizer Movie | Duo To Script | Mad Magazine | Get Tough | Welfare Hotel | All New York | New TV Hero | Squeeze | Jolly Good Shows | Child Death | Gray Panther | Creative Side--1 | Creative Side--2 | Creative Side--3

This site was last updated 02/03/07